1. 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy - Website of the Week

    360 Degrees of Financial Literacy Screenshot

    You’ve heard the saying, “life happens.” Or, at the very least, you’ve heard one or more of the numerous sayings, “(fill in the blank) happens.” Anyway, what we are trying to get at is life is full of ups, downs and its fair share of surprises.

    As is life, your financial situation can also change for better or worse unexpectedly. That is why we have chosen the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants360 Degrees of Financial Literacy as our Website of the Week.

    A tremendous resource for people with and without disabilities. 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy is a free program aimed at helping all Americans better understand their personal finances through every stage of life.

    So, whether you’re a teen, college student, newly employed, married or single, have a disability or a recent retiree, our Website of the Week keeps you in tip-top financial shape whenever “life happens.”      

  2. Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Puts Emphasis on Financial Literacy

    For the first time in more than twelve years, the United States Senate and House of Representatives have overwhelmingly passed a new version of the Workforce Investment Act. The new legislation, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) modernizes and improves existing federal workforce development programs.

    There are multiple provisions in the new WIOA that focus on financial literacy for youth and adults with and without disabilities. Allowable statewide youth activities supporting financial literacy include:

    • Supporting the ability of participants to create household budgets, initiate savings plans, and make informed financial decisions about education, retirement, home ownership, wealth building, or other savings goals;
    • Supporting the ability to manage spending, credit, and debt, including credit card debt effectively;
    • Increasing awareness of the availability and significance of credit reports and credit scores in obtaining credit, including determining their accuracy (and how to correct inaccuracies in the reports and scores) and their effect on credit terms;
    • Supporting the ability to understand, evaluate, and compare financial products, services, and opportunities; and
    • Supporting activities that address the particular financial literacy needs of non-English speakers.

    Local youth activities also include within the menu of services to be provided the support of financial literacy.

    At an adult level, statewide employment and training activities must improve the coordination of employment and training activities at a local level for individuals with disabilities that also includes financial literacy activities. Required services at a local level must include “career services,” which requires the provision of information understandable to One-Step customers on assistance through the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

    Listed as one of the purposes of the Act is not only the support of a “comprehensive, accessible, and high quality workforce development system” but also includes the goals of “increasing the prosperity of workers and employers” and “increas[ing] economic self-sufficiency.”

    NDI will be working with the U.S. Department of Labor to help the workforce investment system implement these provisions to advance financial literacy and capability. 

  3. NDI’s Six Steps to Creating a Financial Literacy Program in Your Classroom or Transition Program - Publication of the Week

    Financial Literacy Program Six Step Cover

    So, this month we have highlighted various financial capability/financial literacy tools, resources and publications in recognition of National Financial Capability Month. This time, however, we are digging into our own vault for this week’s Publication of the Week - Six Steps to Creating a Financial Literacy Program in Your Classroom or Transition Program. Because, honestly, who better than National Disability Institute (NDI), the nation’s first non-profit exclusively dedicated to improving the financial capability and capacity of people with disabilities, to discuss improving the financial health of all people?!?

    This guide is an excellent resource and provides a roadmap to guide special education teachers, transition specialists and disability advocates as they develop financial literacy programs for persons living with disabilities.

    At a time when nearly 1 in 3 Americans with disabilities live in poverty, financial literacy and associated programs are vital to building a better economic future for people with disabilities and key to a successful transition from school to work or college.

  4. MoneyWi$e - Website of the Week →

    Screen Shot of MoneyWise homepage

    MoneyWi$e is a national financial literacy partnership between Capital One and Consumer Action that combines free, multilingual financial education materials with community training and seminars to give consumers at all income levels both the information and the practical assistance they need to make smart financial decisions.

  5. Financial Workshop Kits - Website of the Week →

    Screen grab of the Financial Workshop Kits Homepage

    Created by the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE), the Financial Workshop Kits contain information needed to create engaging and meaningful financial education programs. Financial Workshop Kits is designed to help effectively teach money management skills in your community. Through this site, you have access to workshops, tools, and other resources that can be used separately or together to empower people to make the best financial decisions for their values and unique circumstances. Of particular interest is the workshop geared toward family members and caregivers of children with disabilities.

  6. April is National Financial Literacy Month! Check out SmartAboutMoney.org →

    The language of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) includes, “assure their [citizens with disabilities] full participation, independent living and economic self-sufficiency.”

    National Disability Institute is the first national non-profit dedicated exclusively to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. An important component of economic empowerment is knowledge, which is why we are excited to celebrate National Financial Literacy Month!  

    Each Tuesday in April, we will share with you a useful resource designed to inform you about spending, saving, and earning. Check back each week for a new tool!

    Smart About Money

    Screen cap of Smart About Money Homeapage

    Today we continue our weekly series of tools to help you celebrate National Financial Literacy Month with SmartAboutMoney.org. Smart About Money was designed to help you get quick tips on budgeting, reducing debt, and setting financial goals. The site can also help you find a wealth of information about dealing with all of life’s financial challenges whether you are starting your first job or getting ready to retire. The site is a product of the National Endowment for Financial Education® (NEFE®) which is an independent, nonprofit foundation committed to educating Americans on a broad range of financial topics and empowering them to make positive and sound decisions to reach their financial goals.

  7. April is National Financial Literacy Month!

    Photo shows a hand dropping a coin into a piggy bankThe language of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) includes, “assure their [citizens with disabilities] full participation, independent living and economic self-sufficiency.”

    National Disability Institute is the first national non-profit dedicated exclusively to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. An important component of economic empowerment is knowledge, which is why we are excited to celebrate National Financial Literacy Month!  

    Each week in April, we will share with you a useful resource designed to inform you about spending, saving, and earning. Check back each week for a new tool!

    Money Smart

    Would you like to save money, improve your financial outlook, or buy a home? The more you know about budgeting, banking services, credit, and managing your money, the more likely you are to achieve your financial goals through financial education.

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) recognizes the importance of financial education, particularly for people with little or no banking experience. That’s why they created Money Smart, a training program to help adults outside the financial mainstream enhance their money skills and create positive banking relationships.

    Money Smart is available in two versions: an instructor-led versionand a computer-based instruction (CBI) version. Both versions consist of the same 10 modules:

    Bank on It - an introduction to bank services

    Borrowing Basics - an introduction to credit

    Check It Out - how to choose and keep a checking account

    Money Matters - how to keep track of your money

    Pay Yourself First - why you should save, save, save

    Keep It Safe - your rights as a consumer

    To Your Credit - how your credit history will affect your credit future

    Charge It Right - how to make a credit card work for you

    Loan To Own - know what you

    Your Own Home - what home ownership is all about 

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    Learn more about FDIC’s Money Smart:

    National Disability Institute - Financial Education: Getting Money Smart

    FDIC - Money Smart: A Financial Education Program

  8. Financial Literacy Now - Website of the Week →

    Screenshot of Financial Literacy Now Homepage

    Financial Literacy Now is an initiative to raise awareness about the critical importance of financial literacy and provide greater access to financial literacy training, services and information. The Campaign for Financial Literacy is being spearheaded by The McGraw-Hill Companies and its nonprofit partners and targets the general public with an emphasis on supporting kindergarten through high school teachers. The website includes financial education tools, tutorials, resources, videos, and games.

  9. Promoting Financial Success in the United States: National Strategy for Financial Literacy 2011 (PDF) →

    Promoting Financial Success in the United States: National Strategy for Financial Literacy 2011, from the US Treasury’s Financial Literacy and Education Commission was created through a process that included conversations with private, public, and non-profit representatives from the field. Articulating a vision of sustained financial well-being for individuals and families in our nation, this document sets strategic direction for policy, education, practice, research, and coordination in the financial literacy and education field.

  10. Money Smart - Website of the Week →

    Money Smart is a financial education program developed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Money Smart was developed to assist individuals develop financial skills and positive banking relationships. The Money Smart curriculum is available free of charge in four primary formats:

    • An instructor-led curriculum for adults on CD-ROM available in seven languages and print versions for the visually impaired (learn more)
    • An instructor-led curriculum for young adults between the ages of 12-20 on CD-ROM, Money Smart for Young Adults (learn more)
    • A self-paced Computer-Based Instruction (CBI) format online for all ages in English and Spanish (learn more)
    • A portable audio (MP3) version, Money Smart Podcast Network  (learn more)